National Register of Historic Places

 

hp 19780660_10155214459620783_3235067460013436214_o.jpg

Highland Park is now officially on the National Register of Historic Places as of April 10, 2017.  This was a huge undertaking initiated by Merle Landis in partnership with the West Rockhill Historical Society. Hats off to Larry and the rest of the Highland Park Historical Committee for finishing what she started.

The Tabernacle was the first structure erected at Highland Park.  It seats over 600 and still stands as strong as ever.

Highland Park qualifies for the National Register because, in addition to its historic integrity, location, design, and workmanship, Highland park is a prime example of how the camp meeting movement developed, and also demonstrates specific styles of architecture, as well as demonstrating typical camp meeting layouts in the late 1800s.

Bethel.jpg
 Bethel cottage (on left, same cottage)

Bethel cottage (on left, same cottage)

Highland Park qualifies for the National Register because it:

  • Retains historic integrity. Location, setting, materials, design, workmanship, feeling and association.

  • Meets National Register criteria A for contribution to the development of the camp meeting movement.

  • Meets National Register criteria C for architecture. It is an excellent example of camp meeting cottages and related buildings. Carpenter Gothic architecture. Camp meeting design and arrangement of buildings.

  • Is locally significant.